Hit Tracker is now ESPN Home Run Tracker! Hit Tracker founder Greg Rybarczyk is now collaborating with the ESPN Stats & Information Group to continue tracking all MLB home runs, and helping baseball fans know "How Far It Really Went!™" Please credit any information on this site to ESPN Stats & Information Group. For more information and analysis on home runs, please contact founder Greg Rybarczyk. E-Mail ESPN Home Run Tracker
Main Page | Ballparks | Park Overlays | Glossary | Highlight Homers | Feedback | Bio | 3 Types of HR's | AAA Home Run Derby Last Updated: August 20, 2014, 10:31 pm PST
Welcome to the ESPN Home Run Tracker! Check out the ESPN MLB Scoreboard throughout the 2014 season! Contact us at grybar@hittrackeronline.com.

Highlight Homers

"Glenallen Hill, Wrigley Field, May 11, 2000" |"Ted Williams, Fenway Park, June 9, 1946" |"Mickey Mantle, Yankee Stadium, May 22, 1963" |"Barry Bonds, Angels Stadium, Oct. 26, 2002" |"David Ortiz, Fenway Park, May 1, 2006" |Albert Pujols 10/17/2005 |"Richie Sexson, Bank One Ballpark, April 26, 2004" |"Ryan Howard, Citizens Bank Park, June 20, 2006" |"Reggie Jackson, 1971 All-Star Game, Tiger Stadium, July 13, |"Bo Jackson, 1st Career HR" |"Roberto Clemente, Forbes Field, May 31, 1964" |"Mark McGwire, Jacobs Field, April 30, 1997" |"Daryle Ward, PNC Park, July 6, 2002" |"Mark McGwire, Busch Stadium, May 16, 1998" |"Manny Ramirez, SkyDome, June 3, 2001" |"Andres Galarraga, Pro Player Stadium 1997" |"David Ortiz, 2004 All Star Game, Houston, TX" |"Juan Encarnacion, Yankee Stadium" |"Jose Canseco, Skydome"
 
"Glenallen Hill, Wrigley Field, May 11, 2000"
On May 11, 2000, Glenallen Hill hit a home run out of Wrigley Field, across Waveland Ave. and onto the roof of a building across the street. Estimated at the time at over 500 feet, Hit Tracker has been used to determine "how far it really went." Using video from the home run and atmospheric data from Weather Underground (66 degrees, 18mph out to left field), the trajectory has been reconstructed. Hill's bomb left the bat at 116.7mph at an angle of 33.9 degrees above vertical (an excellent angle for a ball struck with a strong following wind), and if unobstructed, would have flown an amazing 500 feet even!


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